Best Shoes For Over Pronation

The best shoes for over pronation are a great way to reduce the risk of injury, which often results from over-pronation. The best shoes for over pronation will help you to prevent this excessive inward roll of the foot as it hits the ground. They also help you to keep your body balanced through every step you take.

The problem with most shoes is that they don’t offer enough support for those who have weak ankles and ankles that roll inward when they walk or run. This means that they need extra support to ensure that they can continue to move freely and reach their full potential while exercising.

If you suffer from any kind of foot pain, whether it be heel pain or knee pain, then it’s important that you invest in some good quality running shoes with plenty of cushioning and support. You should try out several different pairs until you find one that fits perfectly and feels comfortable on your feet.

Best Shoes For Over Pronation

When walking or running, it is normal for the arch of your foot to flatten slightly and for your foot and ankle to roll in a bit as your foot strikes the ground. “This is known as pronation and is a normal part of gait,” says Loretta Logan, DPM, MPH, professor and chairman of the Department of Orthopedics and Pediatrics at the New York College of Podiatric Medicine & Food Center of New York. However, overpronation—or excessive rolling of the foot and ankle along with arch flattening—can be problematic and lead to foot fatigue, pain, and injury.12

Tested & Approved

Our top women’s choice, Brooks’ Ariel 20 provides all-day comfort and built-in stabilization to help with overpronation. Our top men’s pick, New Balance’s 990v5 keeps feet supported on both short walks and long days.

There are a number of things you can do to address overpronation, but wearing motion-controlled (or stability) shoes is a good place to start. Motion control shoes can help stabilize your foot and “limit the range of motion of the foot, thereby blocking excess pronation,” Logan says. When shopping for a motion control shoe, you’ll want to look for a shoe that has an inflexible heel and thick midsole with good arch support.

To find the best walking shoes for overpronation, we interviewed five podiatrists who helped us understand what to look for in a motion control shoe and asked them for any specific shoe recommendations. After further research, we put our top shoes to the test by walking over 100 miles.

Best Women’s Overall: Brooks Women’s Ariel ’20 Running Shoes

Brooks Women Ariel 20 Running Shoes

Our Ratings

  • Cushioning 5/5
  • Responsiveness 4/5
  • Lateral Stability 5/5
  • Fit 4.5/5
  • Value 4.5/5

Pros

  • Good cushioning
  • Strong shock absorption
  • Lightweight

Cons

  • Run slightly narrow

Our best women’s overall pick, these shoes earned our top spot thanks to their perfect score of 5 out of 5 for cushioning and stability—two very important features to look for in motion control shoes for walking.

Brooks Ariels are technically considered running shoes, but they give walkers who overpronate everything they’d want in a shoe, and more. In fact, the running shoe design makes them more flexible and responsive than most other motion control walking shoes—which allowed our tester, who suffers from overpronation, to walk for miles at a time without fatigue or pain. Our tester’s feet never felt tired or sore after any of the test walks, and she continued to wear the shoes all day.

While these shoes run a tad narrow, they offer a snug, comfortable fit and don’t rub or chafe in any spots due to the seamless mesh design, which earned them a perfect score of 5 out of 5 for blister protection. Another aspect of these shoes that stood out to our tester was how light they felt, especially compared to other motion control walking shoes we tested. They are soft, comfortable, and don’t require any break-in period.

These shoes feature Brooks’ signature BioMoGO DNA midsole and GuideRails technology, which are designed specifically for overpronators who need extra support. We also love that the shoes are approved by the APMA (American Podiatric Medical Association)—a seal of approval given by podiatrists who have tested the shoes—which means they meet specific criteria and are deemed to promote good foot health.

Price at time of publication: $160

Materials: Engineered mesh upper | Cushioning: BioMoGo DNA midsole | Weight: 10.7 ounces | Closure: Lace-up

Best Men’s Overall: New Balance 990v5 Running Shoe for Men

4.9

New Balance 990v5 Running Shoe for Men

Our Ratings

  • Cushioning 4.5/5
  • Responsiveness 4.5/5
  • Lateral Stability 5/5
  • Fit 5/5
  • Value 4/5

Pros

  • 6 widths options
  • Good support
  • Comfortable

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Heavy

New Balance’s 990v5s earned our top spot for men thanks to their superior comfort and support—which earned them a perfect score of 5 out of 5 for both fit and stability. We particularly recommend these for long walks. During his walks, our tester found them to be responsive, yet well-cushioned, giving his feet the support they need for longer distances.

The Ortholite insert offers overpronators the stability they need to support feet, ankles, knees, and hips, whether you’re out for a short stroll, brisk walk, or plan to spend hours on your feet.

We also like that they feature a simple yet stylish design, so you can feel confident about what’s on your feet and won’t stick out if your walk takes you to a local coffee shop or even to brunch.

The New Balance 990s come in six different widths for sizes 7 to 16, so there’s an option for every shape and foot size.

Price at time of publication: $200

Material: Foam midsole, mesh upper | Cushioning: Ortholite insert with foam | Weight: 13.7 ounces | Closure: Lace-up

Best Women’s Budget: Skechers Arch Fit Comfy Wave

Skechers Arch Fit Comfy Wave

Our Ratings

  • Cushioning 4.5/5
  • Responsiveness 5/5
  • Lateral Stability 4/5
  • Fit 4/5
  • Value 5/5

Pros

  • Stylish
  • Lightweight
  • Machine-washable

Cons

  • Run slightly narrow
  • Shallow toebox

We love Sketchers’ Arch Fit Comfy Wave shoes for their superior support, comfort, and style, all at a budget-friendly price point. During her test walks, our tester found them to be light, comfortable, and flexible—earning them a nearly perfect score of 4.5 out of 5 for upper comfort—while still supporting her feet for several miles.

Despite being lighter and much less visually bulky than many motion control shoes, they still offer good arch support with their Arch Fit insole system—a podiatrist-approved arch support system. The lower ankle cuff allows for more movement, which is desirable to some who walk for longer distances, but this also makes them a little too light for those who need additional ankle support.

We love that the shoes are machine washable, come in four attractive colors, and are available in sizes 5-11 in both medium and wide widths. Our tester, who tried the medium width, did note that they run a little narrow and have a relatively snug and shallow toe box. If you have a wider foot or like a little extra room for your toes, you may want to try the wide.

Price at time of publication: $90

Material: Mesh fabric upper, synthetic outsole | Cushioning: Arch Fit insole | Weight: 10 ounces | Closure: Lace-up

Best Men’s Budget: Reebok Ridgerider 5.0 Cross Trainer

Reebok Ridgerider 5.0 Cross Trainer

Reebok

Our Ratings

  • Cushioning 4/5
  • Responsiveness 4/5
  • Lateral Stability 4/5
  • Fit 4.5/5
  • Value 4.5/5

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Good on uneven surfaces
  • Comfortable

Cons

  • Run slightly snug

We love that the rubber grippy outsole of the Men’s Reebok Ridgerider Cross Trainers offers good traction, giving you continued support on uneven surfaces. We also like that the shoes offer support and stability at a reasonable price point.

Upon first trying them on, our tester noticed that they provide a snug yet comfortable and supportive fit without feeling tight, which earned them a nearly perfect score of 4.5 out of 5 for fit and a perfect score for upper comfort. They’re on the lighter side, which makes them easy to wear for many miles.

The shoes offer good arch support but lack the extra heel support and customization that some other higher-end walking shoes provide. Ultimately, these are good, classic walking shoes that have a number of must-have features for overpronators at a good price point, which is why we gave them a 4.5 out of 5 for value.

Price at time of publication: $65

Material: Synthetic upper with mesh panel, rubber outsole | Cushioning: Soft EVA midsole cushion | Weight: 10.6 ounces | Closure: Lace-up

Best for All Day Wear: New Balance Women’s 1540v3 Running Shoes

New Balance Women's 1540v3 Running Shoes

Our Ratings

  • Cushioning 5/5
  • Responsiveness 4/5
  • Lateral Stability 5/5
  • Fit 5/5
  • Value 4/5

Pros

  • Good lateral support
  • Good cushioning
  • Durable, grippy sole

Cons

  • May feel stiff at first
  • Heavy

The New Balance 1540 is not only great for walking, but transitions well to running errands, playing with your kids, or even for a long day on your feet at work. They’re comfortable, supportive, well-cushioned, and made of durable materials. The ENCAP midsole paired with the Rollbar system gives them one of the best lateral supports out of all the shoes we tested—earning them a perfect score of 5 out of 5 for this feature—which is incredibly important for overpronators.

Our tester noted that they felt a little stiff at first, but after a few miles, they loosened up without losing their support. They’re available in five widths in sizes 5-13, making them a great shoe for a variety of foot shapes and sizes.

Price at time of publication: $170

Materials: Mesh and synthetic upper, rubber outsole | Cushioning: ENCAP Midsole, ROLLBAR heel | Weight: 13 ounces | Closure: Lace-up

Best for Trails: Apex V753 Trail Runner Active Shoe

Apex V753 Trail Runner Active Shoe

Apex

Our Ratings

  • Cushioning 4.5/5
  • Responsiveness 3.5/5
  • Lateral Stability 5/5
  • Fit 4/5
  • Value 4/5

Pros

  • Good traction
  • Roomy toe box
  • Comfortable

Cons

  • Not very responsive
  • Heavy
  • Run big

If you’re hitting the trails, it’s important to have a shoe that offers excellent stability and really good traction underfoot, and the Apex Women’s Trail Runner meets (and exceeds) those criteria.

While stiffness isn’t traditionally a quality you look for in a walking shoe, it’s actually a good thing when you’re walking on uneven surfaces. The rigidness and strong arch support of this shoe earned it a perfect score of 5 out of 5 for lateral stability and support.

Our tester also liked that the high and wide toe box gives your feet room to swell, which can happen on longer, harder trail walks. We like that the high ankle collar adds a nice touch for extra support—just be sure to wear higher socks to avoid any chafing or unwanted blisters.

Price at time of publication: $143

Materials: Mesh and leather upper, rubber outsole | Cushioning: V-last | Weight: Not specified | Closure: Lace-up

Best for Plantar Fasciitis: Orthofeet Coral Stretch Knit Shoe

Orthofeet Coral Stretch Knit Shoe

Our Ratings

  • Cushioning 5/5
  • Responsiveness 4/5
  • Lateral Stability 4.5/5
  • Fit 4/5
  • Value 4.5/5

Pros

  • Highly customizable
  • Good heel and arch support
  • Sweat-wicking material

Cons

  • Limited colors and designs
  • Run wide

With adjustable arch support, strong heel cushioning, and an ergonomic sole, the Orthofeet Coral Stretch Knit shoes are an excellent choice for anyone who overpronates—but they’re especially good for those with plantar fasciitis. From the moment our tester laced them up, these shoes were incredibly comfortable and provided support without feeling heavy—which earned them a perfect score of 5 out of 5 for both upper comfort and cushioning. That comfort remained throughout all of our tester’s walks.

One thing that stood out to our tester in particular about these shoes is that they were more responsive than most motion control shoes she tested, making longer walks less tiring. The roomy toe box is perfect for anyone with a wider top foot or bunions, but they do run a bit wide for someone with an otherwise normal foot.

Orthofeet Coral Strech Knit shoes come in standard, wide, and extra-wide widths in sizes 5-12. They come with an adjustable arch insert, three insoles, and room for a custom orthotic, making them the most customizable shoes we tested.

Price at time of publication: $143

Materials: Knit upper, rubber outsole, moisture-wicking polyester & PolyU foam inner sole | Cushioning: Innovative Ortho-Cushion | Weight: Not specified | Closure: Lace-up

Best for Long Walks: Brooks Addiction Walker 2 Shoe

Brooks Addiction Walker 2

Our Ratings

  • Cushioning 5/5
  • Responsiveness 4.5/5
  • Lateral Stability 5/5
  • Fit 4/5
  • Value 5/5

Pros

  • Good cushioning
  • Comfortable
  • Responsive

Cons

  • Warm
  • Run narrow

If you’re looking for a supportive shoe that offers comfort and flexibility, and can be worn for miles, the Brooks Addiction Walker 2 is a great choice. When our tester first laced them up, she felt the all-over cushioning and support but noticed that they didn’t feel as stiff as many other motion control shoes we tested. These qualities earned the shoe high scores of  4.5 or 5 out of 5 for almost every attribute we evaluated while testing.

Brooks’ signature BioMoGo DNA cushioning offers support along with flexibility, which helps propel you forward more easily on walks. This cushion is paired with an Extended Progressive Diagonal Rollbar for additional support for overpronators. The Addiction walkers are also slip-resistant and APMA-approved.

The one drawback of these shoes is that they are made with leather, which makes them a bit too warm to wear on hot summer days. These do run narrow, so if you have a wider foot, consider trying the wide width, even if you don’t usually buy wides.

Price at time of publication: $130

Material: Leather, rubber slip-resistant outsole | Cushioning: BioMoGo DNA | Weight: 12 ounces | Closure: Lace-up

Best Cushioned: Vionic Women’s Walker Classic Walking Shoes

Vionic Women's Walker Classic Walking Shoes

Our Ratings

  • Cushioning 5/5
  • Responsiveness 3/5
  • Lateral Stability 5/5
  • Fit 4/5
  • Value 4/5

Pros

  • Good support
  • Good all-over cushioning

Cons

  • Stiff
  • Not responsive

As soon as she laced up Vionic’s Classic Walking Shoe, our tester felt the benefits of the all-over cushioning. The cushioning extends to the toebox, providing extra comfort, and earning this pair a perfect score of 5 out of 5 for this attribute. However, the extra padding and use of leather material do come at a cost—it makes the shoes a little warm and a little stiff at first. This, combined with the fact that the shoes feature a significant number of seams, means that walking in them could lead to blisters if worn on a warmer day or for a longer walk, which is why they lost some points for blister protection.

During test walks, our tester felt the support from the shoe’s Active Motion System technology, which includes a removable orthotic, molded midsole, and thermoplastic heel. The higher heel cuff provided additional ankle support, which is ideal for those with sensitive ankles or previous ankle injuries.

On longer walks, our tester did note that it took a little extra effort to propel herself forward, but that’s a tradeoff a walker needs to make for the max level of cushioning and support a shoe can provide.

Price at time of publication: $110

Material: Leather upper, mesh liner, PU foam base, rubber outsole | Cushioning: Active Motion System technology | Weight: Not specified | Closure: Lace-up

Best for Max Support: Apex Boss Runner Active Shoe

4.4

Apex Boss Runner Active Shoe

Our Ratings

  • Cushioning 4/5
  • Responsiveness 3.5/5
  • Lateral Stability 5/5
  • Fit 4/5
  • Value 4/5

Pros

  • High and wide toe box
  • Room for custom orthotics
  • Removable insole for customization

Cons

  • Stiff
  • Heavy

If you’re looking for a maximum motion control shoe, we recommend Apex’s Boss Runner shoe. The Carboplast footbridge provides excellent stability and keeps your foot stable on uneven surfaces, which earned it a perfect score of 5 out of 5 for lateral stability.

The shoes are a favorite among the podiatrists we interviewed for their ability to be semi-customized, thanks to their removable insole and the fact that they offer plenty of room for a custom orthotic. The high and wide toe box makes them a great pick for someone with bunions, wider feet, or for someone who just likes extra room in their toe box for possible swelling.

Our tester did feel like what you gain in stability you sacrifice in flexibility and responsiveness, which is why these shoes earned a lower score for our responsiveness attribute.

Our tester also noticed that the shoes felt a bit heavy on her feet and felt a little stiffer at first compared to other shoes she tested. But for those with significant overpronation and related joint pain, these provide the support you need to be on your feet for hours.

Price at time of publication: $150

Materials: Rubber outsole, synthetic upper | Cushioning: Carboplast footbridge for motion control and stability | Weight: Not specified | Closure: Lace-up

How We Selected and Tested the Best Walking Shoes for Overpronators

We selected which motion control shoes to test by reviewing dozens of top-rated shoes for overpronators from the best walking shoe brands on the market. We also interviewed five podiatrists and asked them what to look for in shoes for overpronators. We then put our top 12 picks to the test.

Two testers tested each shoe by wearing each pair for three different walks: a 3-mile walk at a moderate pace, a 3-mile walk at a brisk pace, and a longer 5-6 mile walk at a moderate pace. All shoes, with the exception of the trail shoe, were tested on roads and sidewalks. The trail shoe was tested on a flat dirt trail.

After each walk, our testers rated each shoe on a scale of 1 (would not recommend) to 5 (best in class) for each of the following attributes: cushioning, responsiveness, shock absorption, upper comfort, fit, lateral stability and support, and blister protection. We also gave each shoe a value score by comparing the shoe’s cost to its overall quality. 

What to Look for in Walking Shoes for Overpronators

Arch Support

A thick, stiff, supportive midsole will provide arch support, ensuring that your arch doesn’t collapse when you walk. Many shoe brands will refer to this as a “medial post.” A firm sole can also help provide additional support. Some people may also benefit from a custom orthotic or semi-custom insert for even more support. These can be worn with neutral shoes or motion control shoes based on the level of support you need. 

Cushioning

The cushion of the shoe helps absorb the impact of the foot hitting the ground, which is especially important on faster walks. Overpronators benefit from extra cushioning in the heel and midsole.

Most motion control shoes have a thick sole at the heel, which is a good sign of additional cushion and support. 

Durability 

A good pair of walking shoes should last for dozens, if not hundreds, of miles. They should also hold up to all-day wear, if you’d like to wear them just as much for running errands as for fitness walks. All the shoes on our list are known for their longevity, so you can trust that they will hold up to lots of activity. 

Fit

“A properly fitting shoe will feel good right from the start when you put it on, so there is no break-in period,” Grace Torres-Hodges, DPM, a podiatrist in Pensacola, Florida, says.

The shoe should feel slightly snug at the heel and around the sides of the foot so that your foot doesn’t slide around, which could cause blisters. But the toe box should be roomy enough for your feet to swell a little, which can happen when walking for longer distances or in warmer weather.

You also want about a half-inch of space from the toe to the end of your shoe (or about the tip of your thumb). If you wear custom orthotics (or special inserts), choose a shoe that has a removable insole and enough extra space to fit the thicker orthotic insert of your choosing.

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